Coping with a stoma is different for everyone.

Caitlin McGinnis
Caitlin McGinnis
I’m learning it’s okay to cry and feel sorry for myself. I am also learning how to cope with these feelings.

Being a mental health and medical professional, I know first hand that your health greatly affects your emotional state.  I am usually in a good state of mind despite how I am feeling physically.  However, I have felt very sad lately.  I’ve been in this funk for more than a few days and I think it’s a combination of things.  I feel homesick living so far from my family.  I live with chronic neck and back pain daily.  I struggle with dehydration daily.  I struggle with finding happiness in different aspects of my life.  I feel exhausted all the time.  I don’t sleep well.  All of these stressors affect my emotional state. 

We are programmed to push on and move forward and forget to be present.  I’m learning to be present in the mood that I’m in.  I’m learning it’s okay to cry and feel sorry for myself.  I’ve been through a lot and it still affects me and always will.  I am also learning how to cope with these feelings. 

Coping looks different for everyone.  Coping for me is writing this blog post.  Coping for me is taking a walk with my friend who also suffers from a chronic illness.  Coping for me is reaching out to my loved ones for support.  Coping for me is eating healthy.  I am constantly learning and trying new ways to cope better. 

When you’re in that funk, it can be so hard to focus on your coping mechanisms.  But it’s also okay to embrace that funk and be present in it.